Skip to content Sitemap

Service Animals in Utah Housing

Hoping this information will answer some of your questions regarding Service Animals and Emotional Support Animals.

Utah’s disability rights act prohibits housing discrimination against those with disabilities, including those who use service dogs. Landlords may charge those with service dogs a security deposit for damage or wear and tear on the property, but only if the landlord charges a similar deposit for others.

The federal Fair Housing Act prohibits discrimination in housing accommodations against those who use service animals. You must be allowed full and equal access to all housing facilities, and may not be charged extra for having a service animal (although you may have to pay for damage your animal causes). If your lease or rental agreement includes a “no pets” provision, it does not apply to your service animal.

Pursuant to the federal Fair Housing Act, housing facilities must allow service dogs and emotional support animals, if necessary for a person with a disability to have an equal opportunity to use and enjoy the home. To fall under this provision, you must have a disability and you must have a disability-related need for the animal. In other words, the animal must work, perform tasks or services, or alleviate the emotional effects of your disability in order to qualify. (For more information, see the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s guidance on service animals.)

Posted by: Carla on February 19, 2018
Posted in: Uncategorized